Health Policy & Regulatory

Get informed about health policies and regulations that set in motion the vision of future healthcare.  Read what our healthcare communications leaders internationally think about the ongoing developments in healthcare legislation, health reform, and more.  We encourage comments and discussions! Share your opinions and ideas to readers like yourself and our bloggers.

Recent Blog Posts

Jeff Levine's picture

Remembering the "Jackson Hole Group"

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Jeff Levine is an award-winning journalist who was the medical correspondent for CNN for 17 years.  He has also worked on Capitol Hill for Senator Byron Dorgan, as Washington bureau chief for WebMD, and as a media specialist at Ketchum.  The following is the second in a series of Jeff’s perspective on the Affordable Care Act, based on his opinions generated during his many years of observing and reporting on these issues. – Nancy Hicks, Senior Vice President, Associate Director, Ketchum North America Healthcare Practice

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Joe Wagner's picture

Independent Payment Advisory Board - A New Approach to Controlling Medicare Costs

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The Washington Post editorial page recently [[wysiwyg_imageupload:71:]]stated the obvious when it started out by declaring that “there is no silver bullet to controlling health-care costs, whether in public programs such as Medicare or in the private market.” So Washington being the political zero sum game town it has become, Medicare is being used as a political hot potato right now by Republicans, Democrats, presidential candidates, interest groups and the media who for all their political gamesmanship can’t dance around the fact that Medicare will start running out of money in 2024 -- five years earlier than projected last year. Read full post »

Jeff Levine's picture

Healthcare Reform: From the Beginning

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Jeff Levine is an award-winning journalist who was the medical correspondent for CNN for 17 years.  He has also worked on Capitol Hill for Senator Byron Dorgan, as Washington bureau chief for WebMD, and as a media specialist at Ketchum.  The following is the first in a series of Jeff’s perspective on the Affordable Care Act. – Nancy Hicks, Senior Vice President, Associate Director, Ketchum North America Healthcare Practice

 

[[wysiwyg_imageupload:55:]]It’s hard to believe that the “Affordable Health Care Act” has just turned one year old.  In fact, it’s hard to believe that the Congress was able to pass any comprehensive health reform law, given the historic obstacles. 

As a health care reporter, I witnessed the demise of the Clinton plan. Personally from CNN’s Washington bureau in 1994 as democratic supporters tried in vain to get the bill to the senate floor for a vote. Read full post »

Joe Wagner's picture

Observations on the Affordable Care Act

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[[wysiwyg_imageupload:39:]]Implementing health care reform by trying to provide access and affordable coverage for more Americans is an experiment that the country will be undertaking over the next decade. It is safe to say that passing the Affordable Care Act did not stop the health care reform debate in Congress, if anything, it gave it legs. It’s fascinating to watch Congress continue to debate the political merits of how to best provide and pay for healthcare on the macro level.

But what happens when Members of Congress, who have the gold standard of health care coverage in the country, are faced with deciding whether to accept “government” health benefits. Politico recently ran a revealing story entitled “Insurance reality hits House GOP  that delved into the juxtaposition of how political ideology about health care reform is being tempered by the reality of how to pay for one’s own for health care. Members of Congress who opted out of the Federal plan were surprised at how high their monthly premiums cost. Read full post »

Nancy Hicks's picture

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – One Year Later

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[[wysiwyg_imageupload:40:]]The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act had its one year anniversary on March 23.  This legislation, the most sweeping since Medicare, reaches in to every aspect of the healthcare system and is forecast to account for one in five dollars spent on goods and services in the U.S. in 2019.   Too big to fail?  Certainly too big to be ignored.

It is not surprising that the occasion of the anniversary of the law’s passage would ignite the partisan responses that have characterized the reform fight from the beginning.  Opponents of the law have used the anniversary as an occasion to call for its total repeal or for the repeal of key elements like the individual mandate.  Supporters led by advocacy groups such as Families USA are promoting the law’s benefits at a grassroots level in every state, focusing on people who have been helped by specific provisions.  Read full post »